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Blog Category: The Detroit Bureau

Be Wary of Flood Damaged Vehicles After Sandy

Hurricane Sandy

Megastorm Sandy has finished cutting a path of destruction throughout the northeast portion of the U.S., but the impact of this epic storm will be felt in the auto industry for quite a while. One thing to be particularly aware of is the influx of flood-damaged vehicles into the used car market, as detailed in an article at The Detroit Bureau.

Another Big Toyota Recall, Yet Still Tops in Loyalty

Toyota Logo

Toyota announced the recall of 2.5 million vehicles in the U.S., part of 7.4 million worldwide to address an issue with the driver’s side power window switch. If not properly maintained, this issue could result in melting, smoke, and possibly fire. This, on top of several years of assorted other recalls, now totalling over 14 million.

This Week in Blurbs

This Week in Blurbs

Here are stories from this week that are interesting, odd, entertaining, and/or of remotely tangential interest to the auto buyer, in blurbs:

  • Forbes compiled a list of the most beautiful cars of 2012. Beauty comes at a price apparently, because every one of them is extraordinarily expensive.

Longer Trade-In Times Inspiring Better Design

2013 Ford Fusion

Two reports, by AutoMD and Black Book, are showing that owners are holding on to their vehicles longer and for more miles than ever, as reported by The Detroit Bureau. Ten years and 150,000 miles are no longer unusual.

The AutoMD survey showed 78% of owners plan to keep their vehicle for more than 10 years, with only 3% expected to change cars within 3 to 5 years. And according to the Black Book Study, most trade-ins will have 125,000 to 150,000 miles by the time owners get a new vehicle.

This is a significant change from the glory days of the automotive past.

This Week In Blurbs

This Week In Blurbs

Here are stories from this week that are interesting, odd, entertaining, and/or of remotely tangential interest to the auto buyer, in blurbs:

Where Are Gas Prices Heading?

Gas Prices

When gas prices hit a national average of $3.92 a gallon in April of this year, most people expected a painful summer driving season of ever-increasing prices. Charting the prices showed nothing but a steady climb since January. And didn’t it always seem like gas prices jumped just in time for our summer road trips?

But then a funny thing happened: Over the following two months, gas prices dropped nearly as steadily as they had risen, to a national average of $3.37 a gallon. Drivers rejoiced, overall MPG of cars sold dropped, and the summer driving picture started to look quite rosy.