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Blog Category: NHTSA

Drive Safe – April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Sponsored by the National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA, the same department that runs safety tests on all vehicles) April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month.  To kick off the month-long events the U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced the Department of Transportation's first-ever, national advertising campaign and law enforcement crackdown to combat distracted driving. Television, radio and digital advertisements using the phrase U Drive. U Text. U Pay. ran from April 7-15 coinciding with a nationwide law enforcement crackdown in states with distracted driving bans.

5-Star NHTSA Safety Rating & Controversy for Tesla Model S

Tesla Model S

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) awarded a 5 Star Safety Rating to Tesla's Model S, adding to the impressive awards already earned by the vehicle. And while achieving top marks for safety is an impressive feat, the news hasn’t been without controversy.

54.5 MPG by 2025 - Positive or Negative For Car Sales?

New Fuel Economy Standards

By now most people are aware that the EPA has passed new regulations regarding minimum fuel efficiency standards that will take effect in 2025. But not too many people are completely aware of what this will mean to them and to the American automotive industry.

 

The New EPA Regulations in a Nutshell

The EPA is the government agency charged with monitoring the fuel efficiency and emissions of all cars made and/or sold in the United States. They have promulgated numerous regulations in the past decades in regard to both emissions and fuel efficiency. Until now, most fuel efficiency regulations have dealt with how vehicle manufacturers are to perform fuel efficiency tests and how they are to announce the results of these tests.

What Is An American Car?

What is an American Car?

“Be American, Buy American.” That was a popular bumper sticker from not all that long ago. The Big Three’s dominance of the American car buying market had slipped dramatically to Japanese imports, the Japanese economy looked like a juggernaut threatening the stability of our own economy, and the patriotic cry was to support American industry by buying American cars. Of course, it was easy to make the distinction then; If it was from Ford, GM, or Chrysler it was an American car. Everything else was an import.